Novel Effect’s 2019 Reading List

Here is a list of our recommended titles to read out loud this year! Packed with fun sound effects and lively music from Novel Effect, these popular books are sure to keep your little one engaged for the entire story, whether they are reading themselves or just listening.

Make a resolution to read aloud more and join in on our pursuit to get every child to love reading in 2019!

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Continue reading “Novel Effect’s 2019 Reading List”

Be a Storytime Hero in 2019

Happy New Year Novel Effect-ers!

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#NovelEffectReads2019

You made it through the holidays – the wonderful meals, the family fun, the late night festivities, and the seemingly non-stop gift giving.  And now it is time to kick off those new year’s resolutions! Continue reading “Be a Storytime Hero in 2019”

5 Things on Our Fall Wish List this Year

What started as a craving for pumpkin spice has now evolved into a full-on love affair with Fall. The weather, the smells, the flavors – it’s the seasonal equivalent of a giant hug. We didn’t want to miss a single moment of this autumnal love fest, so we compiled a list of our must-do Fall activities for this year.

What started as a craving for pumpkin spice has now evolved into a full-on love affair with Fall. The weather, the smells, the flavors – it’s the seasonal equivalent of a giant hug. We didn’t want to miss a single moment of this autumnal love fest, so we compiled a list of our must-do Fall activities for this year.

  1. Plant a Fall Garden

Why do Spring and Summer get to have all the gardening fun? The Fall weather practically requires you be outdoors, and a Fall garden of colorful gourds is a great way to get kids experimenting with new foods. Tomie de Paola’s “Strega Nona’s Harvest” has some helpful gardening tips and is fun to read together after a day in the dirt.

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  1. Apple Picking

Load up the kiddos, hop in the car, and yee-haw to the closest apple orchard. A family road trip always ends up with one or two new stories to add to the family legacy (keep the TVs and video games off for best results). When you finally arrive, everyone can run around through the rows of trees, play with other families also glad to be out of their car, and enjoy some cider (we’ll let you decide how hard that cider needs to be).

  1. Celebrate Science

November 8th (NOV8 – innovate – get it??) is National STEAM Day, set aside each year to inspire kids to explore interests in Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math. The internet is full of STEAM activities you can do as a family, but we suggest these and these. We also highly recommend reading “Little Leonardo’s Fascinating World of Technology” with Novel Effect – it combines science, tech, and art!

  1. Root, Root, Root for the Home Team

America’s pastime culminates every Fall as the best-of-the-best battle it out during the World Series. Even if your team didn’t make it to the big showdown, pick a team as a family (or take different sides if competition is more your thing) and watch the games together. Learn the cheers, get into the spirit, and have some fun! If you want a story to go with the big game, we recommend “Casey at the Bat” or the newly added “Baseball Saved Us,” which tells the story of how baseball shaped a young boy’s experience in an internment camp during WWII.

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  1. Pumpkin Carving

Of course, pumpkin carving, right? Not very imaginative… or is it?!? Dun, dun, dun! You don’t have to go far down the Pinterest rabbit hole to find some impressive ideas! Find some inspiration and challenge yourselves to try something new for Jack this year.

 

This is our wish list this Fall, but we want to know: what’s on yours? Head over to our Facebook page and let us know what your family plans to try this Fall.

Reading, Reading, Reading: Five Ways to Foster the Home/School Connection

Now that school is under way and your children settle into their routines, how can you ensure connections with your kids stay at the forefront? Linking experiences from home to school (for example, reading a story aloud) can establish the connections that children need for success in later literacy learning. Here are some ways you can build literacy bridges to school and home:

Greetings Novel Effectors!

Now that school is under way and your children settle into their routines, how can you ensure connections with your kids stay at the forefront? Linking experiences from home to school (for example, reading a story aloud) can establish the connections that children need for success in later literacy learning. Here are some ways you can build literacy bridges to school and home:

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  1. Know what they’re reading

Many teachers provide a booklist. Do you have it yet? Chances are you’ve seen the books they’re reading in your own library or at home. Build up your library with these titles (or make a weekly habit of checking out titles from the local library!)

  1. Create a literacy rich environment

I know how busy you are, but this checklist has some great and simple guidelines for ensuring you’re giving your child a very important gift. There is one for the classroom as well, so you can see if your child’s teacher has these elements in place to ensure connections between home and school.

  1. Talk about the books

Even if you don’t have a book, you can still talk about it. Search for a youtube video of it – Youtube has thousands (maybe millions) of videos of books being read aloud. Once you’ve watched it yourself or online with your child, connect it to something in the child’s home life.

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  1. Encourage your child to share at school

We all help our children with homework and learning. Use this as an opportunity to connect what you’re reading to them at home with what they are reading or doing at school. And, if you want to share Novel Effect with their classroom as a literacy activity, we thank you and support that 100%!

  1. Start Early

Research shows we should be reading to children as early as six months (and earlier than that won’t hurt). For your littler folks who are not yet in school or daycare here are some ways to build pre-literacy experiences from community outings. This site is aimed at parents of children with disability, but it provides wonderful ideas for children of all abilities.

 

Have fun and keep on reading,

Melody Furze,

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Chief of Education, Novel Effect