8 Books to Help Kids Understand Their Feelings

Books can be a great tool for connecting and empathizing with all kinds of different emotions.

Kids come with a wide range of emotions, some are more difficult to handle than others. Feelings like anger, frustration, loneliness, worry, sadness, grief, and fear can be uncomfortable, but learning to deal with them all is an essential part of growing up. 

It’s important for kids to be able to accept all their feelings, even the uncomfortable ones. We can talks with them about comfortable and uncomfortable feelings—rather than good or bad—to better equip them to accept any of the feelings that come with being human. 

Books can be a great tool for connecting and empathizing with all kinds of different emotions. As you read these stories talk about the feelings of the characters, ask questions, listen, and learn.

The Kissing Hand

When Chester the raccoon is reluctant to go to kindergarten for the first time, his mother teaches him a secret way to carry her love with him.

Grumpy Monkey

When Jim the chimpanzee can’t shake his bad mood one day, he discovers the danger in suppressing unexplained feelings.

The Color Monster

When Color Monster wakes up with his emotions all over the place, a little girl helps him gains self-awareness and peace by identifying each feeling through color.

The Feels

Join Yeti on a journey of self-discovery as she meets her feelings and learns how to take care of each one.

The Rabbit Listened

When Taylor’s block castle is destroyed, all the animals think they know just what to do, but only the rabbit quietly listens to how Taylor is feeling.

Download the Novel Effect app for free to bring these stories to life with music and sounds that respond to your voice.

First Day Jitters

Whether you’re already a few weeks into the school year or have the first day rapidly approaching, we’ve compiled a list of books that you can read with your children or students to help them process all the emotions running through their little bodies this time of year.

While adorable pictures may be flooding your social media, the back to school time of year evokes different emotions for different people. Teachers may dread it. Parents may celebrate it. And kids…. well, kids probably have lots of big emotions that they aren’t sure how to express just yet, ranging from anxiety to excitement.

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Photo by Rachel on Unsplash

 

Whether you’re already a few weeks into the school year or have the first day rapidly approaching, we’ve compiled a list of books that you can read with your children or students to help them process all the emotions running through their little bodies this time of year.

 

The Invisible String by Patricia Karst

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This story deals directly with the issue of separation anxiety. Remind your little ones with the relaxing music that even if you aren’t there, we are all connected by an invisible thread that unites us all.

 

The Wonderful Things You Will Be by Emily Martin

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Through beautiful illustrations and soothing rhythms, this book paints the picture of a parent’s acceptance of their child in all the child’s wonderment, creativity, and aspirations. Reinforce that you support your child at story time to give them an extra boost of confidence on their first day!

 

Wherever You Are, My Love Will Find You by Nancy Tillman

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Love, love, love. If a child can count on nothing else in a crazy world of bullies and skinned knees, the one constant is your love for them. The soundscape is dreamy and perfect for bedtime or nap time, helping your kids rest easy.

 

Little Blue Truck by Alice Shertle

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Sure, it’s a classic you’ve probably read 8,000 times already, but it’s a great reminder of the value of friendship. The happy sound effects keep story time lively and lends itself to lots of discussion questions about the kids in their class (and which animal friends remind them of their human friends).

Back to Something….

It’s a time for renewal, for starting over and getting to know a new class of wonderful students, making new friends and celebrating a new chapter of teacherdom. At Novel Effect, we’ve been there. We know that you want something new to spice up the ol’ lesson plans.

Teachers cringe, librarians prepare, and parents rejoice!

Teachers, here’s something you might not want to hear, seriously, cover your ears, shut off the lights, pull down the shades (dun, dun, dun)…

It’s BACK TO SCHOOL (cue terrifying music and lightning flashes!)

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It’s not all terrifying though. It’s a time for renewal, for starting over and getting to know a new class of wonderful students, making new friends and celebrating a new chapter of teacherdom.

At Novel Effect, we’ve been there. We know that you want something new to spice up the ol’ lesson plans. Dust off those favorite books. Pair our awesome soundscape for “Giraffes Can’t Dance” with a music and movement activity. You’re all getting to know each other so it’d be fun to start with a book about the importance of being yourself. With our soundscape you can teach children different genres of music and then break into a movement activity.

Better yet read Oliver Jeffer’s fantastic “The Way Back Home” which coincides with the back-to-school theme of leaving home and making friends. Here are some great ideas for activities. Then, spend the time you were going to come up with accompanying activities enjoying one last summer evening cocktail instead.

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It’s a myth that librarians spend their entire summer reading hundreds of books. They actually read thousands! I jest, but librarians love a good story and the beginning of the year means setting up your space to encourage reading and interaction. Here is an adorable Mo Williams display for the library or classroom. Read “Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus” with our soundscape to address some of those bus ride anxieties and then have a pigeon noise contest!

While teachers and librarians might be scrambling to get ready, parents are breathing a sigh of relief. Put those babies on the bus, brew a cup of tea, throw on some Netflix and just enjoy all that peace and quiet….until school calls because Joey’s got a fever. Read him “Alexander and the Horrible No Good Very Bad Day,” with Novel Effect (one of my favorites) and then drink this tomorrow instead of tea.

No matter what your role, reading stories is probably a big part of what you do. We want to thank you for helping our littlest learners become book lovers now and the whole year through!

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3 Tips to Survive “Back to School”

Now that Labor Day is behind us, there’s no getting around it. School is back! The change in routines, peers, teachers, and workload can be a daunting task for kid and parent alike. We’ve compiled three tips to help you through the transistion!

Continue reading “3 Tips to Survive “Back to School””